July 27, 2015

Sales get negotiated. Reimbursements? Not so much. #PPSellsBabyParts

You've probably seen the second undercover video of a senior Planned Parenthood executive haggling over the price of aborted baby parts (if you haven't, scroll down). Word is there are more such videos yet to be made public. In the second video, Dr. Mary Gatter, President of Planned Parenthood's Medical Directors Council, is seen negotiating the price of pieces from aborted babies. During the conversation Gatter suggests $75 as an appropriate price for organs. The actor posing as a buyer responds that she would expect to pay $100. Not sure why this didn't tip Gatter off to something strange. How often does a buyer raise the asking price? Gatter must have been blinded by greed because she went for it and at the end of the conversation even suggested that, if $100 is too low, they could always bump it up. After all, as she said, "I want a Lamborghini." 

Here's the point. Planned Parenthood can say that this is about reimbursements all they want. But reimbursements happen when you get paid back for the actual and documented costs of whatever it is you are doing, which, of course, means that reimbursements are non-negotiable. If you want to be reimbursed, you present the receipts or vouchers that show your costs, then you get paid for those exact numbers. No bartering involved. What Dr. Gatter says in the video is different because it sounds like she is trying to find the market price for baby livers. She's haggling. And when haggling comes into the picture, it sounds a lot like a sale is being negotiated, which is why so many of us don't believe it when Cecile Richards tells us that Planned Parenthood is not profiting from the sale of organs from aborted babies. But who can blame them? Everyone knows a Lamborghini costs an arm and a leg.

2 comments:

Me said...

Dear Mr. O'Reilly,
You are to be commended for being a strong witness for Life. Thank you for your courage in condemning the evil of abortion. That being said, I respectfully ask how you can continue in the Methodist denomination given the endorsement of abortion rights found in the Methodist Book of Discipline. I am very interested in your thoughts as I struggled with this issue until eventually leaving the Methodist Church.

Matt O'Reilly said...

Thanks for your question. The UMC statement on abortion is not as bad as it could be, but it could certainly be much stronger. I'm interested in doing what I can to cultivate a stronger pro-life UMC. I've done that in a variety of ways, which include work through the local church, writing legislation to General Conference, articles in UM publications, and through this blog. I take it as part of my vocation as an ordained member of the United Methodist clergy to speak for the preborn who cannot speak for themselves, even if (and especially if), I speak on their behalf to the weaknesses of the United Methodist Church. As an alternative to leaving the UMC, I would respectfully and heartily encourage pro-life UMC clergy and laity who struggle with the current denominational position to lend their energy to the fight for a stronger pro-life position. The more pro-life Methodists there are, the more likely we are to achieve our common goals. Hope that helps. Thanks for reading and commenting.

Matt O.